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March 23, 2014

The Remarkable Coin Cache

My wife and I were heading to Southern Utah for a teaching conference. It was June 4th and school had just let out for the summer the day before. Both of us are Middle School Science teachers so this was our first vacation for the summer. When we… More
March 07, 2014

Shamanic figurine guarding shaft tomb discovered in Colima

A shaft tomb containing skeletal remains along with a rich assemblage of grave goods, has been discovered in a later cemetery in the state of Colima, Mexico by researchers at the National Institute of Anthropology and History Archaeologist Marco… More
February 11, 2014

Filmmakers search for Montezuma's treasure in Kanab pond

KANAB, Kane County – For 100 years, locals have believed Montezuma’s treasure lies at the end of a tunnel below Three Lakes pond in Kanab, Utah. Now, filmmakers hope to discover just what is there. Producer Mike Wiest along with landowner Lon Child… More

On Christmas Day last year, Kathryn Bard got an unusual gift.

Working with her colleagues to remove sand from a hillside along Egypt's Red Sea coast, the Boston University archaeologist poked through a small opening that had appeared and felt . . . nothing. She had reached into the entrance to a human-made cave in which sailors stored their gear as many as 4,000 years ago.

Two days later, Bard's team found a larger cave nearby. The same ancient seafarers used this one, she and her colleagues surmised, as a temple or shrine.

These and other discoveries at what was once a port known as Mersa Gawasis offer an unprecedented look at the earliest known sea expeditions conducted for pharaohs. Egyptian archaeologist Abdel Monem Sayed first explored this site 30 years ago, but he didn't report any signs of chambers.

"We know of no other Egyptian ports from this time," Bard says. "Finding these mariners' caves was a big surprise."

Published in News
Saturday, 07 May 2005 19:52

Cavers Reach "Bottom of the World"

In a newly released photograph from the May National Geographic magazine, caver Alan Cressler, shown last August, rappels into Krubera Cave in the Caucasus Mountains of Russiathe world's deepest. Cressler was part of first phase of the Call of the Abyss project. The project's second expedition, in October, became the first to descend more than 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) underground.

Published in News