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March 23, 2014

The Remarkable Coin Cache

My wife and I were heading to Southern Utah for a teaching conference. It was June 4th and school had just let out for the summer the day before. Both of us are Middle School Science teachers so this was our first vacation for the summer. When we… More
March 07, 2014

Shamanic figurine guarding shaft tomb discovered in Colima

A shaft tomb containing skeletal remains along with a rich assemblage of grave goods, has been discovered in a later cemetery in the state of Colima, Mexico by researchers at the National Institute of Anthropology and History Archaeologist Marco… More
February 11, 2014

Filmmakers search for Montezuma's treasure in Kanab pond

KANAB, Kane County – For 100 years, locals have believed Montezuma’s treasure lies at the end of a tunnel below Three Lakes pond in Kanab, Utah. Now, filmmakers hope to discover just what is there. Producer Mike Wiest along with landowner Lon Child… More
  • The carriage and horse skeletons were discovered in the village of Svestari in north-east Bulgaria
     
  • They were found in a Thracian tomb along with some decorations
     
  • The discovery was unexpected as treasure hunters have plundered many of the ancient mounds found in the region

 

Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a Thracian carriage and two horses that appear to have been buried upright.

The chariot and horse skeletons are 2,500-years-old and were discovered in the village of Svestari in north-east Bulgaria.

The two-wheeled carriage and carcasses of the horses were found in a Thracian tomb along with some decorations.

Professor Diana Gergova of the National Archaeology Institute at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, who led the dig, said: 'The find is unique, it is not resembling any other carriage dating from the Thracian era ever uncovered in Bulgaria.'

According to Sofia News Agency, the discovery of the carriage was unexpected as treasure hunters have plundered many of the ancient mounds found in the region in a bid to find gold, despite a UNESCO ban of this activity.

The particular mound where the carriage was discovered, is adjacent to the well known Mound of Bulgarian Khan Imurtag, where the same research team uncovered a hoard of gold last year.

A Roman chariot complete with a seat and boot was unearthed along with two buried horses in the village of Borissvovo in Bulgaria in 2010, which shows similarities to the new find, despite being younger in age.

It was thought to belong to Thracian nobility living in the second half of the 1st century AD, judging by the imported goods found in nearby graves.

The burial mount yielded seven burial structures and two pits, one of which held the carriage and horses, HorseTalk revealed.

Experts believe the chariot was placed in a narrow hole with a sloping side to allow horses, decorated with elaborate harnesses, to pull it into its final resting place, after which they were killed.

The evidence of small metal disks on the horses' heads at the new sight, suggest they too were wearing harnesses.

The Borissovo chariot was supported by stones in order to keep it in its final position and offers researchers the chance to see how the vehicles were put together, including a 'boot' which held a bronze pan and ladle, grill and bottles.

A skeleton of a dog chained to the cart was also discovered, and nearby the grave of the warrior who is presumed to have owned the carriage, complete with his armour, spears and swords as well as medication and an inkwell, signifying he was well educated.

Archaeologist Veselin Ignatov, who was involved in the discoveryry of another the chariot near the southeastern village of Karanovo, said around 10,000 Thracian mounds - part of them covering monumental stone tombs - are scattered across the country.

Mr Ignatov said up to 90 per cent of the tombs in the region have been completely or partially destroyed by treasure hunters who smuggle the most precious objects abroad.

 

Published in News

Why would an ancient Thracian people, the Getae, bury – 2,500 years ago – a chariot complete with horses standing upright?

The discovery near the northern Bulgarian village of Svestari, has marveled the archeological team that made it.

It is the oldest such find in the region.

It is evidence of the lavish funeral rites afforded high status Thracians entering the after-life.

Diana Gergova is head of the Bulgarian Archeological team says, “the chariot dates back to the last decades of the fourth century BC, when the Getae dynasty was at its peak and when all these amazing complexes of mounds were built to accommodate burials of several Getae rulers.”

According to archaeologists, this find is not just the first chariot of its kind found anywhere, but also the earliest carriage ever found in Bulgaria.

Archeologists have been taking to the deep close to the ancient sea port of Aenona, off the Croatian coast, to explore three ancient sunken ships.

They have found around 500 fragments, dating from the 9th Century BC that give a unique insight into the local Illyrian people and Liburnians.

The team is most excited by ancient olives and to see if the Liburnians ate the same food as we do.
 

Published in News